September 4, 2022Comments are off for this post.

2022, Common Thread

June 29, 2022Comments are off for this post.

2022, Going Through

November 10, 2021Comments are off for this post.

2021, book design

Designed on the occasion of the gallery's 15 year anniversary, Mercury 20 Gallery at XV: 15 Years of Art and Community, this book includes an essay by Bay Area writer, curator and educator, Glen Helfand. Mercury 20 Gallery is an artist-run gallery founded as a venue for contributing members to exhibit, sell, and promote each other’s art in the Oakland/East Bay community. Twenty-three current member artists are featured along with a timeline documenting the gallery's 15-year history.

Mercury 20 Gallery at XV: 15 Years of Art and Community

Mercury 20 Gallery at XV: 15 Years of Art and Community, softcover, 124 pages, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 x 1/3 inches, 2021.

 

Christine Meuris's Veiled catalog features the artist's solo exhibition at Mercury 20 Gallery in Oakland, California from June 18–July 24, 2021. The artist catalog includes installation photography by Lia Roozendaal, an essay by Amy DiPlacido as well as a statement by the artist.

Christine Meuris Veiled, saddle-stitch, 48 pages, 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches, 2021.

Kathleen King's Aided, Inspired, Multiplied catalog features the artist's solo exhibition at Pro Arts Gallery and Commons in Oakland, California from January 23–March 7, 2020. The artist catalog includes installation photography by Dana Davis, an introduction by Natalia Ivanova Mount and an interview with the artist by Leora Lutz.

Kathleen King Aided, Inspired, Multiplied, softcover, 38 pages, 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches, 2020.

August 12, 2021Comments are off for this post.

2021, to join, to connect

August 8, 2020Comments are off for this post.

2020, Above and Below

The Japanese word for cut, kire, is more connected to aesthetics than its English counterpart. The aim of cutting is to create ma, a word that roughly translates as negative space or betweenness. Jeans, made of cotton and indigo, are deeply rooted in slavery. Through an act of unmaking, I use Japanese shears to dissect and strip (kire) the functionality of clothing, focusing on the material’s meaning. This work speaks of my own complicity in systemic racial injustice. I expose seams from below the surface, cut and assemble individual flies, and roll up balls of jean strips. No longer a castoff, this material is imbued with potentiality and through my process of close examination (ma), it remakes me.

25% of the artist’s proceeds will go to the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights and the Equal Justice Initiative.